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Review of Flash Festival: Allure Theatre Company - The Elephant In The Room at the Looking Glass Theatre

The poor old elephant in the room, that little object sitting upon a "small" box had to endure such activity around him. Did he tumble where all chaos surround him, did he heck!

Allure Theatre's production from the wonderful trio of Hannah Mitchell, Julia-Louise Nolan and Jack Smith particular elephant is obsessions, be they of the stalking variety, pop fandom or OCD. Or OCD, pop fandom and stalking to put them in alphabetical order. For the best part they told the trials of these obsessions in a comedic lighthearted way, with more than an element of clowning. So we had obsessive kissing departures from Hannah and Julia-Louise, we had stalking of his cake prey from Jack (the cake is a lie) and we had a loving relationship between Hannah and Jack, well Hannah anyway.

Our set consisted of a large number of boxes, small, medium and large which were used in numerous ways throughout the busy, very quick scene changing show and also offered us the hysterical moment of Jack trying to fit into a small size.

Another magic moment was the super gurning slow motion fight as two Harry Styles obsessives battled it out, just brilliant. This scene returned later, with Jack once again donning the Styles mask, but this time with a gut punching moment. With so much having been lighthearted before and generally jovial, the switch to #cutforharry was a body blow of a scene, with the spirals of blood released via a ribbon from the wrists of Hannah and Julia-Louise. An incredibly powerful, and oh so brilliant moment.

There is also more tough stuff before we see the end as Jack confronts his stalker in another powerful scene. This is the light and shade that was mentioned in another review and much could be learnt from this particular group.

Also of high praise for this group is the obvious research, preparation and rehearsal. It can be seen throughout on the stage in front of us. The fights, the choreography, the shear punch of the movement scenes have been rehearsed to the extreme to make them clean and perfect. Time and effort pays off and will reward all three of these performers down the line I am sure. Tech consisted mostly of lighting and this was perfect as well, so huge credit on this and indeed whoever was working on it behind the scenes. My aloe vera has never glowed in the dark, so it must indeed be magic.

So a show of tremendous things, short snappy scenes with humour and sadness and some beautiful moments. One of the best so far for me this week.


The Flash Festival 2015 runs between 18th-23rd May, 2015 at four venues across the town. Details can be found at http://ftfevents.wix.com/flashtheatre2015, while tickets can be booked via the Royal & Derngate. Details at: http://www.royalandderngate.co.uk/whatson/2015-2016/Other/FlashFestival15

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