Skip to main content

Review of The Reluctant Dragon by Munchkins & Monsters Theatre Company at Rugby Theatre, Rugby

I first saw a show from Munchkins & Monsters during the 2016 local Northampton Umbrella Fair and their lively tale, Back In Time For Breakfast managed to keep an audience enthralled for an hour in a tent on a swelteringly hot August day, so with that achievement under the belt, it was clear they were doing something very right. As it turned out, the day that I saw this, their show entitled The Reluctant Dragon, the temperature wasn't a great deal cooler, but the lack of the tent meant we didn't get quite cook, even if the performers clearly did during this occasionally very energetic show.

The scene for the performance is set with a simple and clear staging of sheets with cartoon landscape, and puppets and cardboard towers hinting of what is to come. After the piping in of medieval music as we take our seats, our performers of Dale Forder, Hannah Conway and Laura Richardson take to the stage with all the suitable enthusiasm to try to keep an audience of children captivated.

Following a nice little prelude featuring a mini classic medieval adventure, the story introduces us to three dragons, each of which is heralded by each of the performers. Then we the audience are then asked to choose between the three in the most noise wins process. As it turns out the eventual winner matters not (although the kids get the fun required out of it) as all of these pesky dragons are quickly dispatched in some form relevant to their particular skills. This is mainly because this is not about fearsome dragons, but about The Reluctant Dragon, based on the short by Kenneth Grahame.

The main story opens with a genuinely delightful and emotional tale of the farmers meeting with his wife to be. Their romance is told via puppetry and it is perhaps one of the parts that are as much for the adults as the children, and this is the part where any truly good children's production works by bridging the gap to entertain both. Moments that crop up later like affordable housing are unlikely to leave little three years old Johnny smiling, but his parents sure will get it.

The tale is told in simple accessible ways, and full of high energy including a surprisingly physical sword scene expertly and very safely performed in the small space available. Add into this water pistols and audience-invading sheep and you have an hour of entertainment that managed to hold the attention of that well acknowledged tough crowd, children. Perhaps at times, the show might have benefitted from a little more dressing up from the performers, although the simplicity of caps worked, a little more might has made it more visual. When we finally encounter the dragon, his glitter encrusted form is a delight to everyone and his cuteness keeps the whole piece in a non-frightening form for all the ages present to enjoy.

If you should have possession of an child to take for an hour of entertainment, there is little doubt that The Reluctant Dragon is going to entertain them, as it kept a good room full happy during the performance. If no such child is available to you, you could always go and sit in a corner making notes and pretending that you are going to review, it worked for me and I am sure that it may well do for you as well. A little bit of childish entertainment sometimes works tremendously well for grown-ups as well.

«««½

Performance reviewed: Sunday 9th  at the Umbrella Fair 2016, Northampton. 

Munchkins And Monsters have a website for details of upcoming shows at http://www.munchkinsandmonsterstheatre.co.uk/

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Review of A Passage to India at Royal & Derngate (Royal), Northampton

Creating the world of E. M. Forster's A Passage to India for the stage and into a little over two hours running time offers many challenges, not least creating the visual world of India. However, this co-production between Royal & Derngate and simple8 throw away any need for complex sets, and bring the world of India, including some of its wildlife to life via boxes and bamboo canes. The success of this is really quite amazing as perhaps the crowning moment of the elephant brings home the most. Simple8 is an award-winning ensemble group and the way they work together to get their characters travelling through the world of India explains why they have received the awards.

A Passage to India is a 1924 novel telling of Britain's generally unpleasant rule in India and takes as its story an encounter between the elderly Mrs Moore (Liz Crowther), Adela (Phoebe Pryce), who is keen to see the real India, and Dr Aziz (Asif Khan). While their meetings seem pleasant, to begin with, e…

Review of The Flint Street Nativity, performed by University Of Northampton BA Actors at Maidwell Hall (Avenue Campus), Northampton

The Flint Street Nativity was presented by the BA Actors as part of a double bill with The Night Before Christmas, and you could hardly imagine such a difference in style. Tim Firth's genuinely, quite endearing play was quite the opposite to the rough and vicious Christmas spirit of the previous show.

Flint Street offers the intriguing situation of adult performers acting as children as they present to their audience (and always watched by the unseen, but a creepy red lighted teacher, Mrs Horrocks), their production of the nativity. It forms quite a delight of totally recognisable characters from your school days if you are able to remember that far back.

Among my favourite performances from this are Gemma Fensham as the total brat Gabriel, never seeming to have an expression other than sucking a lemon, as she breezily switches her best friend back and forth with abandon. She rather stylishly perfected the sulking strutting off routine as well, fabulous! Playing up to his size with…

Review of Balm in Gilead, University of Northampton BA Acting (Creative Acting) at Maidwell Hall, Northampton

Watching the production of Balm in Gilead sees my entering the fifth year of following the University of Northampton acting students, and what theatre they have provided over the years!

Balm in Gilead is no less intriguing than anything that has gone before, written in 1965 by Lanford Wilson, you might think this would be a dated item for the young students to be performing, however, nothing could be further from the truth. Set in a cafe (transposed to England from its original American setting), it sees the lives of addicts, homeless and sex workers converge into a mixture of good but mostly bad moments.
My first time in the Maidwell Hall saw an encounter with a brilliantly realised community full of the world of the cafe and the surrounding homes, cardboard boxes and dishevelled beds. As we enter the characters of this world begin living alongside us, addressing us, begging us for money, pushing shopping trolleys around offering off the cuff exchanges with the audience and confronti…