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That Oh F*ck Moment at Royal & Derngate (Underground), Northampton

"It was when I" were four words that during the fun, uncomfortable and at times sad performance laid bare many an "oh deary me, that is slightly awkward" moment from the members of the audience. The title of the play chose a little more obvious term for it and indeed many of the stories told were very valid of an expletive or two.

During the hour long show written by Chris Thorpe and Hannah Jane Walker, we were treated to a number of these moments through history as well as randomly exposing several audience members own endevours (including mine). My own apparently was the least likely of the first four selected to have any forgiveness from. Nice. It is always bold to involve the audience in a show and I do enjoy it when it happens, especially like this one when all selected were willing to take part.

Our two performers Helen Gibb and Greg Dallas struck up immensely likable performances as they relayed the tales of woe. Some of these were hugely tragic tales including a plane crash and an incident with a hockey stick which made the chair I was sitting in become more uncomfortable by the second. It was all graphic and magnificently adult and presented in a lovely relaxed style by the two performers. There was even a little technology issue which was wonderfully in keeping with the theme of the show. Whether it should have happened or not, I do not know. However it seemed quite apt.

The two performers had also kindly given up their time and income from the show for the Actors Company bursary scheme at the Royal & Derngate. So this show with a lovely moral tale as well benefited many people in the future.

That moral? We are all human, we all make mistakes. We either except them and move on or learn well from them and keep that plane in one piece. Good fun.


Performance reviewed: Friday 29th January, 2016 (6:15pm show) at the Royal & Derngate (Underground), Northampton.

That Oh F*ck Moment was performed on Friday 29th January, 2016 only at the Royal & Derngate.

For further details visit the Royal & Derngate website at http://www.royalandderngate.co.uk/

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