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Review of The Body Of One Theatre Research Groups first performance at University Of Northampton, Avenue Campus

Bewildering. Confusing. Bizarre. Bamboozling. Oblivious.
All words to describe my opinion of The Body Of One's first performance. However when asked my favourite word to explain my opinion of a production that I didn't quite "get" is "interesting".
I used interesting last night when asked after the show. I like using it.

However, it turned out that this production, influenced partly on Butō (I thought Popeye at first when I heard that if I am honest), was very deliberately ambiguous, verging on what the hell was that? Primarily because of the second part of the evening where we all sat around in a room and tried to discuss what we had understood from the play.

I honestly said last night as I was leaving that the discussion at the end was the best part of the evening as it gave a little more understanding but also allowed me to know that I wasn't the only one confused. It was a bit like the old English Lit days where you watch a Shakespeare play (first if you were lucky) and then dissected the living bejesus out of it.

That whiteboard didn't complete. The meat? What happened behind the curtains (I know, well actually, no I don't)? The meat! All those bird sounds were what? The meat...

If you are still reading now, you must either have been there, or you may be needing medical treatment now. Surely reading this means nothing to you? No? I knew I was right.

However if you are still with me, I have to say that I was happy that I went to the show last night and I would go again to another one (free tea: shall travel). I have seen a few shows, plays, things, call them what you will, this year and to be honest, I have been fortunate that I have enjoyed them all, even the ones I have found "interesting". I always just simply appreciate the skills, the effort, the talent and the time that has gone into them. Never be the one to condone and rubbish, what you are incapable of doing thy self is a motto I could use, if I used mottoes.

However, I think this piece is in danger of getting more confusing than the show, so I will cease now. And really, if you are truly still reading this, I salute you, you honour me so.

The Body Of One is a theatre research group made up of Arte, Fran, Lydia and Sam and their website can be found here: http://tboo-theatre.co.uk/, on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/TBoOTheatre or on Twitter @TBoOTheatre

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