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Review of Sara Pascoe: Animal at Royal & Derngate (Royal), Northampton

I like Sara Pascoe a lot. There is something really endearing and innocent about her storytelling and performance. Even when she is talking about, and even demonstrating hand jobs.

This is only Sara's second tour and having had the pleasure of seeing her first last year, I am happy to see the style remains the same. Her stuttering, sometimes hesitant delivery really works for me, as it's a nice change from the often over confident feeling performers, who sometimes alienate rather than charm. There is also an apparent (but unneeded) wariness of interacting with the audience which facinates. Animal is a heavily prepared affair, that at mere mention of Winston Churchill and his history in India from the audience threatens to derail at any moment. However while Sara at first seems unsure how hatred of Tony Blair has moved her into one audience members loathing of Churchill, she eventually makes it work excellently, even slotting it perfectly into the arrival of latecomers expertly.

The tour title of Animal is loose in context, as the show moves through human life with anecdotes of the like that you are not really sure are true or not. One particular one relating to life insurance appears to be true as Sara allows an audience member to check a disheveled letter for proof. It makes a change from the constant suspicion that no anecdotes are really true. I suppose even comedians occasionally tell true stories in their acts as we all have strange things happen to us now and again.

There are many brilliant moments as Sara weaves us through ninety odd minutes of entertainment. You will leave aghast and never looking at an electric toothbrush the same again. The tale of the sparkly top is a cracker (and a moral one) and the burden of old people feels on this day that I write this even more appropriate (I will leave you to fill the blanks there).

Sara Pascoe is a really relaxing form of comedienne, never aggressive like some are, and although she is tremendously rude at times, it is never offensive and I detected just the single F word, which I always feel is used so lazily by modern comedians. She is brilliant and comes extremely recommended.

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Performance reviewed: Friday 17th June, 2016 at the Royal & Derngate (Royal), Northampton.

Sara Pascoe: Animal was performed at the Royal & Derngate (Royal) on Friday 17th June, 2016 only. Her website for future tour dates can be found at http://www.sarapascoe.com/

For further details about the Royal & Derngate visit their website at http://www.royalandderngate.co.uk/

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