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National Theatre Connections - Tomorrow and A Letter To Lacey at Royal & Derngate (Underground and Royal)

I managed to return to Royal & Derngate on Friday for two further plays in the National Theatre Connections tour and it was really worth it for two very good, but very different plays.

The first was like some sort of ultra rude but very funny version of Grange Hill, following the last day of school, the prom and exam results day. Through very witty, realistic dialogue and superb performance from the young cast, it built some very real solid characters in its 45 minute show. The main cast was also ably assisted by a supporting troupe of young performers who provided the intro, and scene bridging with some nicely playful choreographed work.

Couple with the excellent script from Simon Vinnicombe and the excellent performers of the Samuel Whitbread Academy, this play was an absolute riot from start to finish.


The second very different play was on the hard hitting subject of domestic violence, but was presented with an appropriate level of humour as well. Far from trivialising it, this made the impact better. The cast from local group High Jinks were excellent in all of their required roles, as this was not just an acting play but a very visual performance (the performers creating the car was genius) as well as some very clever musical pieces, reworded familiar tunes.

An excellently written, punchy work by Catherine Johnson and directed by Helen Furniss and Jenaya Smith. A play not only which was enjoyable to watch, but with a real meaning to it. Superb.


For me, although I have only been able to see four of the plays. Connections has been a joy and has shown some really talented performers of the future in some quality plays. If you get the chance to catch any of them as they travel the country until 6th June, you will not be disappointed.

http://connections.nationaltheatre.org.uk/


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